If you don't have a hobby, I highly recommend you find one.

Before we go too deep, let me start by saying I spent the weekend at my grandmother's house. It was just me, my dog and her. I loved every minute of it and it felt just like the summer I lived with her in between semesters at college. We drank coffee, ate sweets (it is grandma's house, after all) and I got to talk to her about her childhood and early years being courted by my grandfather.

And we crafted.

My grandma taught me how to crochet when I was about 13 and I loved it. I even made a blanket that is big enough to cover a king-sized bed. Somewhere along the way, I quit crocheting. I convinced myself I didn't have time or that I had nobody to make anything for. Well, this weekend, we busted out the crochet hooks and after a few practice stitches, I was off to the races again.

Hobbies are important for us as human beings. Whether they are creative, athletic, or puzzling, we need an outlet like that. It's something that fuels the fire within our souls, but also relieves the stress in our lives. Our world is a go-go environment that demands so much of our time, energy and mental capacity.

Hobbies quiet the noise, at least for a moment.

I would encourage you to find something that you loved to do as a kid and pick it up again. My husband recently started building RC cars again and I found myself getting jealous of how much joy it brought him. I envied the fact that he could get lost in his shop building that car for the better part of a Saturday. So I'm thankful that my grandmother reminded me of something that I used to love to do. Something I could get lost in as well.

And if you didn't enjoy anything you did as a kid, then find something. We hear a lot about "self care" these days. I would put hobbies somewhere near the top of that self care list. Carve out a little bit of time, maybe just an hour a day or every other day to start out.

If it brings you any source of joy, peace or motivation, then it is absolutely time well spent.