If you're working from home and you're tired of feeling like you have to be available 24/7, you're not alone.  That's leading to burnout for a lot of people.

Sometimes on a video conference call, it looks co-worker is there, but their video is off and you can't be sure.  It's possible they're slacking and actually on the road to Shreveport, or it could that they're completely dedicated and just need a break.  There is laundry to do and the kids need to eat after all.

Working at home isn't easy, and now that more people than ever are doing it, burnout is a big issue and a lot of workers are looking for any opportunity to unplug.

The NY Post highlighted a new survey that said sixty-five percent of people working from home are working longer hours than ever before, and most are struggling to keep a healthy work-life balance.  More than half of those working at home say they feel more stressed about work than ever before, and a lot of that has to do with the company's expectations and demands.  Or, maybe it's the perception of those expectations.

Most people in the survey said they feel pressure from their company to be working beyond what's required of them, including being available at all hours of the day.  It's replying to emails at 6 am and 9 pm, because that's just the way things seem to work most days.  Most people say they're working over their normal hours at least three times a week because if they don't, they feel like their job may be in jeopardy.

There are some that might take the work-at-home opportunity to unplug and do less, but the vast majority want to continue to prove themselves and show that remote work can, well, work.

So what's the best way to unplug, besides locking the bathroom door and drawing a pumpkin-scented bubble bath and pouring a glass of wine?

More than half of the people in the survey said watching  TV helps them decompress at the end of a long day.  Other coping mechanisms included meditation, cooking, and playing board games.  Nobody mentioned vodka, but that also seems to work for some of us.

Is the company really placing extra demands on workers right now, or are we feeling anxious and disconnected about life in general, and that's causing us to worry about measuring up?  Add that to the list of things we're trying to figure out in 2020.

Hey, thanks for listening at work regardless.  Like chocolate, Netflix, and wine, we promise to be a stress reliever, not a stress adder.  You got this.